Continuity Central – The risky business of technology moves and transitions

In an increasingly technology-dependent workplace, disruptions in technology services ripple through organizations. While the information technology team grapples with service level expectations that are nearing a standard of continuous availability, the real estate and facilities team is under ever-increasing pressure to optimize space, improve productivity and control costs. These two trends collide when offices, facilities or data centers/centres are moved or undergo transition, resulting in additional risk to operations and business continuity. A significant transition mistake can have lasting consequences by adversely impacting your reputation with customers, brand image, and operating productivity.
A technology transition can be triggered by a wide range of changes: a new product or service rollout; a merger or acquisition; a data center or infrastructure upgrade; a cloud initiative; or a real estate transaction or physical facilities move. Technology that might otherwise be taken for granted, much like service from your local utility company, becomes highly visible during real estate or facilities moves, especially when a data center or new systems are involved. Specific examples include technology services that are part of the foundation of the modern workplace such as network and internet connectivity, unified communications, and enterprise software applications. Employees expect to be able to have the technology tools and resources needed to do their jobs. Customers and partners expect little or no disruption. A seamless technology transition is one of the top measures for the success of a move, while conversely, failures are magnified and compound the organizational stress caused by a move.

Continuity Central - The risky business of technology moves and transitions

Alex Carroll

Alex Carroll

Managing Member at Lifeline Data Centers
Alex, co-owner, is responsible for all real estate, construction and mission critical facilities: hardened buildings, power systems, cooling systems, fire suppression, and environmentals. Alex also manages relationships with the telecommunications providers and has an extensive background in IT infrastructure support, database administration and software design and development. Alex architected Lifeline’s proprietary GRCA system and is hands-on every day in the data center.
Alex Carroll