Power Management in Data Centers

Data centers are getting bigger and better, but embracing "green computing" in data centers may very well put the clock back.

Power Management in Data CentersA big challenge in existing data centers is the huge demands of power. The problem is accentuated by the fact that new generation hardware runs faster by using more power. More power means more heat, and more heat means even more power requirement to cool things up. As data centers business continues to grow, more power may not be available. Many planners actually worry that there isn’t enough power to go around for equipment already installed and new equipment would need even more power. It is only a matter of time before systems that are held together delicately start fracturing, taking Internet users offline for hours or even days.

One option for reducing power is using ordinary ambient air by running cooling fans faster and starting to chill only when temperatures reach a higher level, say 32 degrees Celcius. In fact, many data centers in China and equatorial Asia adopt this method as a standard practice.

Another option is proactive power management. Ethernet ports use 40 watts when powered up, even when there is no data passing through them and each data center has thousands of these ports. Monitoring the device and powering it on only when needed helps to reduce energy wastage significantly.

Either way, it is important that data centers keep up to date on how to manage their power and ways to reduce it. To learn more about a power efficient data center setup, contact us at Lifeline Data Centers.

Alex Carroll

Alex Carroll

Managing Member at Lifeline Data Centers
Alex, co-owner, is responsible for all real estate, construction and mission critical facilities: hardened buildings, power systems, cooling systems, fire suppression, and environmentals. Alex also manages relationships with the telecommunications providers and has an extensive background in IT infrastructure support, database administration and software design and development. Alex architected Lifeline’s proprietary GRCA system and is hands-on every day in the data center.
Alex Carroll